TECHNICAL SEMINAR TOPICS


EXPERTS TO SPEAK ON KEY TOPICS AT MIDLANDS MACHINERY SHOW 2017

IMPLEMENTING five farming principles will not only improve and maintain soil health, but also reduce the growth rate of black grass, according to a leading agronomist.

Research carried out by Hutchinsons shows a 5x5 approach, which includes rotation and spring cropping - particularly barley - sowing higher rates of seeds and restricting cultivations to the top of 50ml of soil can boost crop competition to battle black grass.

 


 

 Soil health, and the importance of maintaining this valuable resource to improve farms’ productivity and profitability, is set to be discussed at this year’s Midlands Machinery Show on 22 and 23 November at Newark Showground.

Dick Neale, black grass expert and technical manager at Hutchinsons who is hosting the soil seminar, said: “Maintaining soil health is fundamental, and farmers should implement relevant methods - depending on land-type - to generate the maximum yield. This will also help to reduce the growth rate of black grass, which now affects around 20,000 farms across the UK.

This troublesome weed has developed resistance to many chemical controls, so it is important farmers consider alternative farming techniques to combat black grass growth on their land.

“Our research has shown if all five methods are combined and carried out consistently, farmers could see a significant reduction of black grass on their land within three seasons.”

Dick will be discussing soil health and the 5x5 black grass process at this year’s Midlands Machinery Show as part of a series of expert seminars at the popular two-day farming event, which showcases the newest and best machinery for modern farming methods.

George Taylor, Midlands Machinery Show manager said: “Dick’s expertise in improving soil health and subsequently reducing the problem of black grass will be extremely valuable to farmers, and I would encourage those who visit this year’s Midlands Machinery Show to attend his seminars.”

Soil health will be one of two important topics to be covered by Hutchinsons during the event. Matt Ward, also from the company, will speak to share his expertise on Omnia precision technology which can increase farmers’ productivity, efficiency and profitability.

Meanwhile, another key topic will be covered at the show by agricultural water solutions expert, JRH Water Management. A seminar discussing new solutions and technology to improve water sustainability will demonstrate how using water collecting equipment and sustainable water pumps can allow a farm to operate with no natural or mains water running to a property. These techniques can help farmers to achieve substantial costs savings.

Michael Jorden, managing director of JRH Water Management, said: “We are really excited to be launching our latest water technology at the Midlands Machinery Show. The newest zero energy wireless pump does not require any fuel and therefore offers substantial energy savings for farmers and agricultural businesses as it allows them to become self-sustaining.

“We are passionate about educating farmers about the variety of water saving products that are available. Farmers are heavily reliant on water, and we will be using the seminar at the Midlands Machinery Show 2017 to demonstrate the numerous ways that affordable and sustainable access to clean natural water can be achieved.”

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Nov 16, 2017

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Issued 13th November 2017

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EXPERTS TO SPEAK ON KEY TOPICS AT MIDLANDS MACHINERY SHOW 2017

IMPLEMENTING five farming principles will not only improve and maintain soil health, but also reduce the growth rate of black grass, according to a leading agronomist.

Research carried out by Hutchinsons shows a 5x5 approach, which includes rotation and spring cropping - particularly barley - sowing higher rates of seeds and restricting cultivations to the top of 50ml of soil can boost crop competition to battle black grass.